Undergraduate Course Descriptions  
 

GEOG 101 People and Their Environment -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 2/B.
A broad overview of subjects and ideas in geography, possibly the most internally diverse of the social sciences.  Covers the geographical aspects of topics including weather and climate, landforms, religions, food, cities, economics, culture, politics and much more. While students will be expected to understand the basics of each of the topics covered, the overarching emphasis will be on understanding the relationships among them. As such, the course builds from one topic to the next, ultimately stressing the sheer geographical complexity and wonder of modern life. interact with it. Contemporary economic, politi­cal and social patterns and problems are discussed.

GEOG 150 World Regional Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: ENGL 120. GER 2/B. PD/A or D.
A survey of the world’s major regions. Geographic concepts and principles are used to study the physical, economic, social and political conditions and problems in the culturally diverse world. Spatial expression of culture; specialized behavior patterns; adaptations and way of life in distinct environments. Regional interdependence; implications for development.

GEOG 183 Special Topics: Introductory Geosciences -- 3 hrs, 3 cr.
Introductory special topics in geography, environmental geosciences, or spatial sciences.

GEOG 210 Elementary Field Geography -- 90 hrs field and lab work (1 evening lab and 10 days fieldwork), 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or equivalent and permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Field study of interrelationships of physical environment and settlement of land by people. Students may register for each different itinerary. Fee for transportation, room, and food allowance required.

GEOG 211 Field Geography of New York City and Vicinity -- 6 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101. GER 3/B.
Field study of urban and urban fringe land use. Population distribution; economic activities; transportation facilities. Field mapping. Transportation fee required.

GEOG 221 Economic Geography and Globalization -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor. GER 2/B.
Not open to freshmen. An introduction to the sub-discipline of economic geography, which will include an exploration of the history of both economics and geography, and a rigorous global approach to the subjects. Students will come to understand the history of the development of economic thought, leading up to, and transformed, by today’s crisis, as well as the particularly geographical nature of economic phenomena and processes, and the immense contributions geographers have made to the understanding of economics. Course focus is on the dominant form of global economic activity today, which is capitalistic, and the way this economic structure plays out through different geographies at different historical moments in time.

GEOG 226 Environmental Conservation: Resource Management -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 2/B.
Introduces students to environmental studies with a focus on policy and management of resources. The course will examine issues pertaining to sustaining our resource base (biodiversity, food, soil, water and energy), a review of factors influencing sustainable use, and how humans have impacted these key elements of the natural system.

GEOG 227 Environmental Conservation: Urban Problems -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B.
Covers topics related to environmental problems and their connection to urban areas. The course will begin with a survey of urban systems (transport, water, food, waste and energy) followed by investigating how these systems contribute to environmental problems and their solutions. This investigation will also include a discussion about the connections between rural and urban areas and urban planning that attempts to minimize environmental hazards.

GEOG 241 Population Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B. PD/B or C.
Course will explore several critical issues such as the relationship between population growth and development; immigration and internal migration; how age, race and gender affect other demographic processes; and how and why these processes vary around the world. Additionally, students will examine the “mechanics” of computing population growth and change as well as different ways to visually display measures of population.

GEOG 242 Medical Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq or coreq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
This subfield integrates human and physical geography. Two major themes are disease ecology (relationship of disease to natural and human environment) and spatial/social aspects of provision of medical care in society. The course will examine the concepts and methodologies that form the basis of the discipline.

GEOG 243 Urban Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
TBA

GEOG 244 Political Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
TBA

GEOG 245 Geography of Development -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
TBA

GEOG 247 Cultural Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
TBA

GEOG 250 Geographic Research Methods -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
TBA

GEOG 251 Geography of the United States and Canada -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or permission of instructor. GER 2/B.
Seeks to familiarize students with the regional geography of the United States and Canada. More specifically, the goals are to acquaint students with the dynamic nature of human and physical features that characterize the study area; the ways in which human and natural phenomena interact to create unique place characteristics and sub-regions; the key environmental issues that characterize the study area and its constituent parts; major trends that are affecting the geography of the two countries; and the locations of principal features. The course begins with general overview material, and then examines the various sub-regions of the study area in much greater detail, focusing on key characteristics and environmental challenges.

GEOG 260 Geography of New York State -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or permission of instructor. GER 2/B.
The goals of the course are to learn about the geography of New York State – its physical environment, the distribution of its people and their activities, and the interrelationships between the people and the environment in NYS. and to apply geographic principles and reasoning to a real world situation where NYS is used as an example of regional analysis; and to explore, navigate through, and use the geographic information available on the Internet, especially the information provided by the State of New York. For those in the education sequence an addition goal is to gather and use information about NYS within the guidelines of the National Geography Standards for presentation at a grade-specific level.

GEOG 270 Regional Geography of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Analysis of relationship of natural environment to economic, social and political life of Mexico, Central America and West Indies.

GEOG 271 Regional Geography of South America -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Analysis of relationship of natural environment to economic, social and political life of South America.

GEOG 272 Regional Geography of Europe -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/D.
Analysis of relationship of natural environment to economic, social and political life of modern Europe.

GEOG 274 Regional Geography of the Middle East and North Africa -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Analysis of relationship of natural environment to economic, social and political life of Middle East and North Africa.

GEOG 275 Regional Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Analysis of the relationship of natural environment to economic, social and political life of Africa south of Sahara.

GEOG 277 Regional Geography of East Asia -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Analysis of East Asia’s potentials in terms of natural resources, population, industry and agriculture, with emphasis on China.

GEOG 278 Regional Geography of Russia and Central Asia -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 3/B. PD/A or D.
Analysis of the relationship of the natural environment to economic, social and political life of Russia, the former Soviet republics of Central Asia and Mongolia.

GEOG 283 Special Topics: Geography and Geosciences -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: Vary by course. Regional courses would have no prerequisites. Topical and technical courses would have appropriate introductory-level prerequisites.
Special topics in regional or topical geography, environmental geosciences, or spatial sciences

GEOG 305

GEOG 306

GEOG 321 Transportation Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 221 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
A geographic study and modeling of transportation routes and their influences on the location of economic activity.

GEOG 328 Urban Environmental Problems: Evaluations and Solutions -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or URBS 101 and Jr/Sr standing. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. The special environmental problems of urban and metropolitan areas will be studied, including water supplies, waste management, environmental impact and waterfront use. Natural physical processes, methodologies and techniques will be reviewed and applied to decision making. Transportation fee for field work may be required.

GEOG 334 Political Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Political geography concerns the nature and consequences of human efforts to divide and control Earth. Major topics to be covered by this course include the origin and evolution of countries and their constituent political units; the defining and drawing of political boundaries; territorial conflicts and disputes; the impact of boundaries on personal and cultural identity; centripetal and centrifugal forces that encourage the success or failure of political units; jurisprudence, crime and punishment; electoral geography; war, piracy and terrorism; ownership of ocean floors and outer space; the environmental impacts of political power (zoning, incorporation, height restrictions, land tenure); and symbols of power in the landscape. Lectures and assignments will stress the relevancy of political geography to issues that affect our everyday life.

GEOG 335 International Pollution Issues -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOL 101 or PGEOG 130 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
A study of international trans-boundary pollution and the science, source terms, transport pathways and international impacts of contamination events. The regional focus will change yearly pending current global environmental events.

GEOG 341 Urban Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or permission of instructor, Jr/Sr only. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. Spatial analysis of functions of metropolitan areas. Social and economic characteristics of cities and suburbs. Land use and transportation patterns.

GEOG 342 Geography of International Migration and Ethnicity -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 241 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B. PD/B.
Quantitative and qualitative examination of historic and contemporary international migration patterns. Spatial demographic impacts of immigration policy in the United States with a focus on major urban centers. Comparative analysis of ethnic and racial minorities in the United States.

GEOG 343 Urban Geographic Theory -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 341 or equivalent. GER 3/B.
Spatial analysis of contemporary and theoretical issues concerning the economic growth, transportation, land use, social segregation and political fragmentation in metropolitan areas.

GEOG 347 Cultural Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or permission of instructor, Jr/Sr only. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. This course provides an overview of the field of cultural geography. It will cover the basics as well as recent developments in social and cultural geographic theory. The main focus is to understand relationships between cultures and environments through geographical analyses of processes, landscapes, and identities.

GEOG 348 Geography of Religion -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or REL 110 or 111 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Geographic view of religion and religious phenomena. Origin, diffusion, distribution. Pilgrimages. Environmental impact. Emphasis on the US.

GEOG 357 Geography of New York City and Vicinity -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101, Jr/Sr only. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. Informed immersion in NYC is the main objective of this course. Students will learn by exploration and observation more than by media. The city is the laboratory to complement readings, lectures and discussion. Students will emerge from this class with an enhanced appreciation of the entire city. Study assignments include keeping a journal of walking assignments as well as readings. Field work will focus on the five boroughs of New York City. (Students with difficulties in walking or using public transportation or who have phobias regarding unfamiliar neighborhoods should consider this before registering.) 

GEOG 370 Geography of Sustainable Development in Developing Countries -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or GEOG 270 or GEOG 271 or GEOG 275 or GEOG 277 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Reviews the theories and approaches of international development. Themes include development theory, availability and distribution of resources, population growth, food production, water supply and forestry. The course will also highlight the development and environmental problems that challenge the achievement of sustainable development such as population growth, food and world economic crises, increasing number of the poor and climate change. The course will provide students with theory, methods, problems and analysis of factors that influence sustainable development in developing countries.

GEOG 371 Rural Water Supply in Developing Regions -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150 or GEOG 270 or GEOG 271 or GEOG 275 or GEOG 277 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B. PD/A.
Covers concepts, methods and analysis of rural water utilization and related problems and challenges in developing countries. It will discuss water management and quality and their relationship with sanitation and hygiene education. The course will also discuss methods of providing drinking water in a sustainable manner.

GEOG 372 Field Geography of Peru -- 90 hrs of fieldwork, 3 cr. Prereq: acceptance into Peru Study Abroad Program. Coreq: GEOG 271 or permission of department. GER 3/B.
Regional field study of the geography of Peru. Topics include physical, environmental, historical, cultural, urban, political, agricultural, religious and economic geographies in various ecological zones. Taught in English. Fee for transportation and accommodations required. Completing GEOG 101 or GEOL 101 or PGEOG 130 prior to enrollment is strongly recommended.

GEOG 380 Seminar in Geographic Concepts and Methodology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
An investigation of the evolution, conceptual framework, and methodological approaches of modern geography. Course goals are: increase student competence and marketability as a teacher; review content of geography with teaching in mind; share strategies, ideas activities (as befits a seminar course); familiarization with national and state standards; develop and acquire appropriate classroom-ready materials; acquire a classroom-ready photo collection; explore links to other subjects; and develop appropriate bibliographies of children’s literature and websites.

GEOG 381, 382, 383 Special Topics in Geography -- 1-4 hrs (lec or lec/lab), 1-3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101, 200-level course of which special topic is logical outgrowth, permission of instructor, Jr/Sr only. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. Topics to be announced.

GEOG 383.28 Environmental Ethics -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
TBA

GEOG 385 Geographic Studies in the Field -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: Vary by course.
Geographic Studies in the Field course offered either through the department or in conjunction with Education Abroad, taught primarily outside the formal classroom.

GEOG 391, 392, 393 Individual Study in Geography -- 1-3 cr. Prereq: 2 semesters of geography, permission of department.
Individual studies and readings, with lab or fieldwork where appropriate, carried out under faculty guidance.

GEOG 480 Capstone in Urban and Social Geography

GEOG 490 Honors in Geography -- 1 sem, 3 cr. Prereq: permission of department.
Upper Jr/Sr geography majors only. Individual research to be carried on under faculty guidance. Results must be embodied in an honors essay or equivalent.

GEOG 498 Internship in Geography -- 1-4 cr.
Open to qualified geography majors and minors, upper Jr/Sr only. Opportunities for working in positions of responsibility in professional institutions for academic credit. See undergraduate adviser.

GEOL 100 Introduction to Geology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 2/E.
Plate tectonic theory; volcanism, earthquakes, continental drift, mountain-building. Mineral deposits, fossil fuels. Erosional processes, agents. Hazards. Field trips may be required; transportation fee.

GEOL 101 Introduction to Geology Lab -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 2/E.
Study of minerals, rocks, maps. Field trips may be required; transportation fee.

GEOL 102 Plate Tectonics and the Earth's Evolution -- 5 hrs. (3 lec, 2 lab), 4 cr. Prereq: GEOL 101. GER 2/E.
The second course in geology offered to non-geology majors. It is designed to familiarize students with the main concepts used in deciphering and interpreting earth’s evolution from the spatial and temporal perspective. Topics to be covered include: geologic time; geological principles; earth materials as recorders of past geologic processes; depositional environments and sedimentary rock record; igneous and metamorphic geologic environments and their rock records; evolution of the solar system; plate tectonics and life on earth; origin of the universe; life on earth and the fossil record; Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic life, history and tectonics. Field trips may be required; transportation fee.

GEOL 105 Introduction to Environmental Geoscience -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: ENGL 120. GER 2E non-lab.
Introduction to environmental geoscience focusing on aspects of global change and the interrelationship of earth systems. Review of the evolution of the earth from its origins to potential future developments; environmental problems and issues.

GEOL 180 Introduction to Oceanography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. GER 2/E.
Dynamic processes are responsible for the ocean’s influence on our environment and life cycles on earth. The course introduces students to the broad field of oceanography and specifically identifies areas which are of concern on both local and global scales. The origins of the oceans and life as it exists in today’s ocean will be covered. Lectures will include the sub-disciplines of biological, chemical, physical, and geological oceanography and concepts that relate to continental margins, ocean basins, sediments and seafloor spreading. Emphasis will be given to the interaction between the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean surface currents, deep ocean circulation, waves and tides. The coastal zone as a fragile environment will be highlighted in connection with dynamic physical and biological processes. No lab component.

GEOL 205 Environmental Geology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 101. GER 3/B.
As human populations continue to grow, resource depletion and hazards will become more severe. Many decisions concerning the use of resources, such as water, soil, minerals, energy and space to live, will determine our standard of living and the quality of the environment. Scientific knowledge, combined with human values, will dictate these decisions. This course examines not only the way geological processes operate and impact society, but also how the earth system responds to human activity. The difficult problems associated with extracting enormous quantities of resources needed to sustain modern societies will be discussed. The course will also address ways humans can minimize the risks associated with hazardous earth processes. Quantitative analysis of selected topics will be introduced to provide a deeper understanding of the complexity of today’s environmental issues.

GEOL 211 Field Geology of New York City and Vicinity -- 90 hrs field and lab work, 3 cr. Prereq or coreq: GEOL 101 or GEOL 102. GER 3/B.
Provides you with the essential information about the geology of New York City, plate tectonics, and the philosophy and the practice of geological field work. Students will learn how to use basic field equipment and geologic and topographic maps. The first part of the course consists of field trips using public transportation to the main geologic formations of the New York metropolitan where students examine and identify rocks in situ and non in situ. Basic procedures of geologic field research are taught and students learn to identify, measure, and describe rocks, geologic structures and textures. The second part of the course will be in the laboratory to study the field material, plot information on topographic maps, correlate information and create basic geologic maps, basic geologic profiles and the synthetic geologic column of the NYC Metropolitan area.

GEOL 231 Principles of Geomorphology -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 130 or GEOL 101. GER 2/E or 3/B.
Investigates the geologic forces that shape the surface of the Earth. In the laboratory students will learn to analyze features of the landscape and deduce the processes that produced them. Students will use traditional laboratories as well as Google Earth to learn about a variety of surficial processes.

GEOL 233 Geology of North America -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 102.
Regional study of principal structural units and geomorphic features of continent with emphasis on US.

GEOL 244 Sedimentology -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 102. GER 3/E.
The origin, dispersal, deposition, and burial of natural physical, chemical, and biochemical sediments and the rocks that formed them.

GEOL 248 Principles of Stratigraphy -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 102. GER 3/E.
The study of layered rocks and their distribution in space and time with the objective of reconstruction of earth history; stratigraphic data; sedimentary environmental models; litho-, magneto-, seismic, bio-, and chronostratigraphy; stratigraphic methods; plate tectonics and stratigraphy.

GEOL 280 Marine Geology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 102 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Marine Geology is the study of the seafloor. This course attempts to answer the questions “what?”, “where?”, “when?” and more importantly “how?” in order to better understand the processes that shape the ocean basins and determine the structure and composition of the oceanic crust. The main patterns of sediment distribution in the ocean basins and how sediments preserve a record of past climatic and sea-level changes will be explored. In addition, the role of fluids in ocean sediments and the oceanic crust will be examined. The seafloor sediments will be studied with a focus on their role in marine biogeochemical cycles.

GEOL 332 Hydrology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 101, PGEOG 130 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Designed to provide the basic understanding of how water on the Earth moves, distributes, circulates and interacts with the environment. Focus will be on hydrological processes including precipitation, evapotranspiration (evaporation and transpiration), soil water, ground water, and runoff, which form the complete water cycle at global, regional and watershed scales. The course will also cover some topics on how water responds to environmental changes and strategies of integrated water resources.

GEOL 334 Coastal Geomorphology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 231 or PGEOG 231 or equivalent or permission of department. GER 3/B.
A study of the basic processes shaping the coast and the resulting form; surficial morphology and internal geometry of such forms as cliffs, dunes, beaches and near shore bars. Map exercise and a one-day field trip.

GEOL 380 Advanced Oceanography: Chemistry and Physics of the Oceans -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: one semester CHEM or PHYS, MATH 150 or equivalent. GER 3/B.
The oceans play a significant role in how the climate system responds to anthropogenic perturbations. To understand past, present and future climate, students need to know and understand the world ocean. Oceanography is multidisciplinary. It offers an opportunity to review and to apply many of the concepts taught in the major traditional disciplines of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics. This course will offer an in-depth tour of the complex study of oceanography and an introduction to quantitative methods in oceanography using Matlab. This science-based course requires students to learn and understand, and be willing to work with, physical and quantitative concepts. Students must be prepared to learn the basics of computer scripting/programming syntax and logic, one of the major skills to be acquired in this course.

GEOL 381, 382, 383 Special Topics in Geology and Oceanography -- 1-4 hrs (lec or lec/lab), 1-3 cr. Prereq: 200-level course of which special topic is logical outgrowth, permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Intensive course in various aspects of geology or oceanography. Topics to be announced.

GEOL 391, 392, 393 Individual Study in Geology -- 1-3 cr. Prereq: 2 semesters of geology, permission of department.
Individual studies and readings, with lab or fieldwork where appropriate, carried out under faculty guidance.

GTECH 101 Digital Earth

GTECH 201 Introduction to GIS -- 6 hrs (2 lec, 4 lab), 4 cr. Prereq or coreqs: GEOG 101 or GEOG 150, MATH 101 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Material Fee: $15.
Introduces the means by which geographers analyze the world to better understand geography and geographical processes. It offers an introduction to various methods for interpreting and analyzing spatial data including, cartography, GIS, remote sensing, spatial statistics and survey research.

GTECH 203 Introduction to Remote Sensing

GTECH 301 Quantitative Methods in Geography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201, STAT 113 or 213 or permission of instructor.
Open to Jr/Sr only. Process of spatial analysis. Application of scientific methods to geographic research; sampling; distribution measurement; statistical analysis of spatial data.

GTECH 320 Earth From Above -- 6 hrs (2 lec, 4 lab), 4 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201. Material Fee: $15.
Introduces remote sensing image interpretation and a basic understanding of the use of remote sensing technology in the study of environmental issues and the monitoring of Earth systems. The first half of the course focuses on aerial photography, photogrammetry and image interpretation. The second half focuses on the use of remote sensing in Earth system sciences. Extensive lab exercises include practical assignments and computer-based analysis of remote sensing images. Students will learn basic image interpretation and some web-based image processing skills through various lab exercises.

GTECH 321 Remote Sensing of the Environment -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 320 or permission of instructor. Material Fee: $15.
Focuses on use of satellite images to study the environment and the physical processes involved in remote sensing to better understand the nature and properties of electromagnetic radiation and how it interacts with the atmosphere and the Earth’s surface and a wide variety of satellite sensors. These sensors make measurements in the optical, thermal and microwave electromagnetic spectrums and are used to study issues related to global environmental science and natural resource management. The course includes heavy lab components which will include practical assignments, field exercises, computer-based analysis of remotely-sensed images and the use of image processing software (ENVI) to analyze satellite images. Field measurements will be made in Central Park to facilitate better understanding satellite measurements.

GTECH 322 Digital Image Processing -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 321, and multivariate statistics, elementary linear albegra or permission of instructor.
Course emphasizes the acquisition and nature of digital image data and the tools required to process and analyze remotely sensed data. Topics include: image preprocessing, spectral mixture analysis, image transformation, image classification and accuracy assessment, change detection, information extraction from LIDAR and radar. At least one application for each image processing method will be introduced. This is an advanced remote sensing course. The course includes lab exercises through which students will obtain hands-on experience in digital image processing. The labs include practical assignments and computer-based analysis of remotely-sensed images, and also field work to evaluate the results. The lab will use ENVI, an image processing software, together with the comprehensive data analysis tool IDL.

GTECH 350 Field Topographic Surveying -- 90 hrs of field/lab work (1 day lab, 10 days field), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201, permission of instructor.
Field use of surveying equipment. Notebook and computer data collection relating to horizontal and vertical location on the landscape, including the use of global positioning systems. Field record-keeping and preliminary analysis of results. Fee for transportation, accommodations and food allowance required.

GTECH 351 Field Techniques in Geography -- 90 hrs of field/lab work (3 days lab, 7 days field), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201, any two additional geography or geology courses, permission of department. Material Fee: $300-400.
Observation and analysis of physical geography, biogeography and geomorphology of selected areas. Field geographic techniques such as ground-truthing of remotely sensed images, the use of maps, compasses and GPS to navigate. Fee for transportation, lodging and food allowance required.

GTECH 361 GIS Analysis -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201. Material Fee: $15.
Covers the GIS production process from data modeling and acquisition to editing, analysis, and cartographic output. GTECH 710 addresses students from both geography and other disciplines. Lecture examples, as well as hands-on exercises cover a range of application areas. The course is divided into two equally important parts: lectures, which introduce the theory of GIScience, and lab exercises, which help students with many aspects of the software. The lectures discuss concepts, data, tools, and major aspects to assignments. The laboratory sessions introduce the geospatial data and software tools needed for accomplishing the assignments. They will start at a very basic level, requiring little more than elementary experience with the Windows operating system.

GTECH 362 Geographic Information Science II -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 361, STAT 113. Material Fee: $15.
Examines the principles of geographic information systems (GIS) including an overview of data structures, data types, methods of data analysis, cartographic modeling, and object-oriented GIS. It will also compare the relative merits of different types of GIS software packages. The primary software used will be ArcGIS.

GTECH 380 Analytical and Computer Cartography -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201. Material Fee: $15.
Introduces  modern cartographic theory and conventions, but also provides significant introductory hands-on experience in map design using computer software, specifically ESRI’s ArcView GIS. The majority of topics covered in the course are divided into a lecture and laboratory section. Students are presented with fundamental design theories and principles associated with particular types of maps or related graphic materials in lectures, and then challenged to implement these principles in self-guided hands-on exercises utilizing the software. The course is intended to cover the basic principles of cartography as well as modern techniques which influence map design, presentation, and interpretation processes. Students will develop a series of hard copy maps, charts, and graphics as well as design materials for presentation through digital media.

GTECH 385 GIS Applications -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GTECH 201 or equivalent. Material Fee: $15.
Selected topics in GIS applications to human and physical geographic problems. See department for topics offered. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

GTECH 480 Capstone in Geographic Information Science

GTECH 490 Honors in Geographic Information Science

GTECH 498 Internship in Geographic Information Science

PGEOG 130 Weather and Climate -- 5 hrs (3 lec, 2 lab), 4 cr. GER 2/E. Material Fee: $5.
Offers a basic understanding of how weather systems form, why certain regions have particular types of weather patterns, and what is known about climatic fluctuations across the globe. This includes an understanding of the basic physical principals that determine: how hot or cold a particular location is; how seasonal cycles vary in different parts of the world; and the types and amounts of precipitation. Students learn to analyze several types of weather maps and acquire a basic understanding of central issues related to global climate change, one of the most significant environmental issues of our time.

PGEOG 212 Geography of Soils and Vegetation -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 130. GER 3/B.
Nature and distribution of soils and their vegetation cover. Soil characteristics, formation, classification; plant ecology. Interrelationships. Impact on people.

PGEOG 231 Physical Geography II: Principles of Geomorphology -- 4 hrs (2 lec, 2 lab), 3 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 130 or GEOL 101. GER 2/E or 3/B.
Investigates the geologic forces that shape the surface of the Earth. In the laboratory students will learn to analyze features of the landscape and deduce the processes that produced them. Students will use traditional laboratories as well as Google Earth to learn about a variety of surficial processes.

PGEOG 250 Earth System Science I -- 4 hrs, 3.5 cr. Prereq: at least one 100-level science course or permission of instructor. Prereq or coreq: GEOL 101 or PGEOG 130 or GEOG 226 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
In this course students learn to think of Earth as a system of several components that interact with each other, sometimes in very complicated ways. The components of the Earth system that will be considered include the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere, and the biosphere. While each of these components can, and should, be studied in more detail in separate courses, here the focus is on interactions between them.

PGEOG 251 Earth System Science II -- 4 hrs, 3.5 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 250 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
The second part of a two-course sequence, students continue the objectives of PGEOG 250, and learn about our planet as a system of interacting components, including the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. This course focuses primarily on the biosphere, paleoclimates, and the Arctic climate system.

PGEOG 311 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 120 and MATH 155 or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Covers the basic principles of fluid mechanics including statics, kinematics of fluid motion, integral and differential representation of conservation of mass, linear momentum, the first Law of Thermodynamics, Bernoulli’s equation, dimensional analysis, and elementary viscous flow.

PGEOG 313 Biogeography -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 130, GEOG 101 or BIOL 100/102. GER 3/B.
Provides an understanding of the geographic distribution and temporal variability of biological diversity over the face of the Earth and the biotic and abiotic factors and processes underlying these patterns and dynamics. Completion of PGEOG 250 / PGEOG 251 and GTECH 373 prior to enrollment is strongly recommended.

PGEOG 332 Introduction to Hydrology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 101, PGEOG 130, or permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Designed to provide the basic understanding of how water on the Earth moves, distributes, circulates and interacts with the environment. Focus will be on hydrological processes including precipitation, evapotranspiration (evaporation and transpiration), soil water, ground water, and runoff, which form the complete water cycle at global, regional and watershed scales. The course will also cover some topics on how water responds to environmental changes and strategies of integrated water resources.

PGEOG 334 Coastal Geomorphology -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 231 or PGEOG 231 or equivalent or permission of department. GER 3/B.
A study of the basic processes shaping the coast and the resulting form; surficial morphology and internal geometry of such forms as cliffs, dunes, beaches and near shore bars. Map exercise and a one-day field trip.

PGEOG 335 Urban and Metropolitan Coasts -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 101 or GEOG 101. GER 3/B.
A systematic study of the natural and anthropogenic processes on urban coastal environments. Special emphasis on the coastline of the NY metropolitan area, with examples from coastal cities worldwide.

PGEOG 361 Global Climatic Change -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 130 or GEOL 101 or GEOL 105. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. An intensive introduction to the study of climate change with emphasis on modern climate change, anthropogenic forcing and measured and predicted consequences of this forcing. Students will develop an understanding of natural climate forcing, natural variability and feedbacks in the climate system while concurrently studying the Earth’s climate history, and modern climate change.

PGEOG 363 Environmental Hazards -- 3 hrs, 3 cr. Prereq: PGEOG 130 or equivalent. GER 3/B.
The course, in response to actual and potential hazards, either natural or anthropogenic in origin, will investigate the processes that link fundamental social development to environmental processes that are influenced by human activities. Natural hazards, in many cases, augment the environmental fragility of our society and the consideration of environmental hazards needs to be incorporated into management of climate variability, storms, droughts, floods, earthquakes, etc. An aim is to seek preventive measures and find solutions to act on environmental hazards on national and international levels.

PGEOG 381, 382, 383 Special Topics in Environmental Studies -- 1-4 hrs (lec or lec/lab), 1-3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 105, GEOG 226 or PGEOG 130, one course of which special topic is logical outgrowth; permission of instructor. GER 3/B.
Open to Jr/Sr only. Topics to be announced.

PGEOG 391, 392, 393 Individual Study in Environmental Studies -- 1-3 cr. Prereq: GEOL 105, GEOG 226, PGEOG 130, permission of department.
Individual studies and readings, with lab or fieldwork where appropriate, carried out under faculty guidance.

PGEOG 480 Capstone in Physical Geography

PGEOG 490 Honors in Environmental Studies -- 1 sem, 3 cr. Prereq: permission of department.
Open to upper Jr/Sr environmental studies majors only. Individual research to be carried out under faculty guidance. Results may be embodied in an honors essay or equivalent.

PGEOG 498 Internship in Environmental Studies -- 1-4 cr.
Open to qualified environmental studies majors and minors, upper Jr/Sr only. Opportunities for working in positions of responsibility in professional institutions for academic credit. See environmental studies faculty adviser.

 
 
       
Department of Geography • Hunter College - CUNY • 695 Park Avenue • New York, New York 10065
Phone: 212-772-5265 • Fax: 212-772-5268 • Email: geog@hunter.cuny.edu